Being able to raise for Beat is something I'll cherish forever

Posted 29/11/2017

My journey to fundraising started just over a year ago when my partner Tom and myself decided it was time to give something to the charity that gave so much to me. After a three-year battle with an eating disorder myself, I wanted to give something back to the charity that kept me alive and on the right track because I certainly wouldn't be where I am today without them. Both through the EDICT team in Prudhoe, and Beat’s advice centres, I was able to begin my journey of recovery a total of six years ago. I won’t say it was easy because that would be lying, but I can truthfully say that it was so worth it.

My partner and I chose the Great North Run to be our challenge because we knew it would be a push for us. It was perfect as well because we are both into fitness and keeping ourselves healthy. It was also a great opportunity for me to learn how to use food to fuel myself whilst pushing both my mind and body to new limits.

The training was difficult; however, after hours of support from my boyfriend and family, I kept on going and as soon as I was beginning to see the results, I was hooked.

Thinking back to the day of the race, it all seems so surreal. To think that I was able to run a whole 13.1 miles this year, when I consider where I was six years ago, is incredible for me. Being able to raise around £800 for Beat is something that I will also cherish forever.

My boyfriend was incredible both throughout the entirety of training and the race. He held my hand over the start and finish line, constantly giving me support along the way.

Hearing now about what the money we have raised will help Beat do definitely makes all the blood, sweat and tears worth it. We’re still looking for the next challenge to take on, but for now it’s nice to remember with joy what we have already achieved.

For those of you reading this who have suffered, are suffering or know someone who is suffering: keep going and never give up. Fighting an eating disorder is very similar to running a half-marathon. There are points where you want to stop, where you feel like you can’t go on anymore, but after you hit each milestone you know it’s all worth it. And trust me, when you cross that finish line of recovery it’s the best feeling ever!

Contributed by Kirsty