Computerised Intervention for Bulimia and Binge Eating Disorder

Posted 29/06/2018

Synopsis

This research study aims to target binge eating by combining a computer task and online mentoring. It also aims to explore potential brain mechanisms involved in the maintenance of binge-subtype eating disorders, using the non-invasive EEG technique.

What is the purpose of the research?

This research study aims to target binge eating by combining a computer task and online mentoring. It also aims to explore potential brain mechanisms involved in the maintenance of binge-subtype eating disorders, using the non-invasive EEG technique.

Who can take part?

The inclusion criteria include:

  • Age 18-60
  • Diagnosis of bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder OR reason to believe one may meet criteria for diagnosis
  • BMI above 18.5
  • No neurological condition (e.g. epilepsy)
  • Fluency in English
  • No visual impairment that cannot be repaired with eyeglasses or contact lenses.
  • No ‘severe’ psychiatric comorbidity (e.g. psychosis).
  • No alcohol/drug abuse 

What does the study involve?

The study involves meeting the main researcher, Rayane Chami, at King’s College London, Denmark Hill, twice for EEG recording. Each session will take up to two hours. During the session, participants will be asked to complete four 10-minute computer tasks during EEG recording. Their weight will be checked (if they feel comfortable with that).

Between the two sessions, participants will be asked to complete daily food diaries, will receive access to a month long computerised training task, as well as a month-long one-to-one mentoring.

One of the questionnaires which you would be asked to complete, would include a question about weight but this question would not be compulsory.

How can someone take part?

The first step is to get in touch with Rayane Chami on Rayane.chami@kcl.ac.uk to express interest. After this, Rayane will introduce herself and send the information sheet with more details. If the individual expresses interest in taking part, a 10-minute phone screening will be set up to assess safety and suitability.

Name of Authors

Rayane Chami
Prof Janet Treasure
Dr Valentina Cardi
Dr Grainne McLoughlin

Affiliation

Section of Eating Disorders,
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience
King’s College London

Correspondence

Rayane.chami@kcl.ac.uk

King's College London